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Wild strawberries: Leaves can be dried and steeped in hot water to make a clear, sweet tea that is rich in vitamin C. Berries can be eaten raw or dried


Wild grapes: Leaves can be eaten when cooked for 10 to 15 minutes. Fruits can be eaten raw or mixed with cold water for a refreshing drink. During spring, you can drain out the vines for a wonderful sap.

Wild carrots: (Queen Anne's Lace) Prepare first-year roots as you would carrots.

Dandelions: Young leaves can be eaten raw. Older leaves and buds should be boiled before eaten. Roots can be dried, roasted then ground into a coffee substitute. The flowers make good fritters when fried and dipped in batter.

Clovers: Young leaves can be eaten raw (don't eat too many.) Older leaves can be boiled as a potherb. Flowers can be boiled, then steeped into a healthful tea or can be fried in fat. Seed headscan be dried and ground into a flour. Roots can be scraped and boiled into vegetables.

Milkweed: All edible parts MUST be boiled in several changes of water to get rid of the toxic sap. After boiling it, you can eat the young shoots,leaves, unopened flower buds and young seed pods.

Minors lettuce: The whole plant can be eaten raw or cooked. The leaves are high in vitamin C and iron.

Reed: Young shoots and leaves must be boiled and eaten as vegetables. Freshly green stalks can be dried, ground, and roasted into a great sugar. Seeds can be dried then ground into a flour or dried and boiled into a cereal. Root stalks can be either boiled and eaten as a vegetable or dried and ground into a flour.

Spruce: Inner bark can be peeled, dried, then ground into a flour. Young shoots can be boiled and eaten as vegetables. Green needles can be boiled in water for a delightful tea that is rich in vitamin C.

Sumac: Berries can be bruised, then soaked in cold water for a acid-tasting but refreshing drink. They can also be dried and stored for later use.

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